08 July 2012

Frankenstein – Final

A bit more work on Sunday morning and Frankenstein’s monster is done.

frankfinal2

The colouring is unconventional.  The instructions call for black or dark brown for the jacket and pants.  A pre-painted figure, approved by Universal, in a slightly smaller scaled, appeared a few years ago with a colour scheme similar to this one.  It works.

The figure is stock, from the box with one exception.  The one hand that is turned incorrectly is fixed to imitate the original pose.  Here’s a publicity still from the 1931 movie just to give you an idea of where the pose came from.

Karloff Frankenstein Doorway

-srbp-

3 comments:

Warren Zoell said...

Nicely done Ed!
One would think that Dr. Frankenstein would give his creation a set of cloths that actually fit.

Edward Hollett said...

Thanks again, Warren.

If you check online you'll find plenty of serious builders who questioned the design of the kit in a couple of respects. One was the shape of the head. You can see the difference in the amount of hair on the forehead, for example, by comparing the shot of the kit with the Karloff shot. Not surprisingly someone generated an aftermarket replacement.

The other was the length of the sleeves. In the movie, the costumers left the jacket short in the sleeves to show how much larger the monster was compared to normal men. They also added extra sole to the boots to give him greater height.

Moebius' casting makes the arms that much longer than even in the movie version. If you look at the Karloff original, the sleeves are short but not quite as short as in the kit.

Again, some modelers adjusted the kit. Some have lengthened the sleeves with fabric or putty. At least one other drilled out the sleeves and stuck the arm slightly up the sleeve.

This was a fun build for me because it was all paint work and little construction. That's a change from the conversions I have gotten lost in over the past few years. It also fits with my movie collection lately that now includes all the Universal monsters from the 1930s. Moebius has a nice collection that compliments the movies. This Frank even has the Universal legacy logo from three years ago, showing that it is a bit more than a licensed product. Their Frankenstein kits match the 1930s movies as does the new Mummy, the Invisible Man and Dracula. The latter is called the Broadway Dracula, as Lugosi played the character on Broadway first. Nonetheless, it corresponds to the 1931 movie character. The only one Moebius hasn't reworked is the Wolfman.

Meanwhile for those who remember the Aurora kits, reissued by others including current mould owners Revell, they actually correspond to the 1940s versions of the monsters. If I understand correctly, Revell has reworked a couple of the moulds to change the faces, on Dracula, for example. That makes my Drac (from the original moulds and issued in the late 1960s, to be more vaulable.

And for those who might be curious, I do have some of the original issue Aurora monsters and figure kits, pretty much intact. I've got the Jekyll kit, for example, and bought the reworked one by Polar Lights. The plan is to do a side-by-side presentation and rehabilitate the old kit.

Warren Zoell said...

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