24 February 2010

Experience counts…again

A lawyer who represents himself has a fool for a client.

Someone who plays at being their own public relations counsel?

Same thing.

In light of recent events, it seems appropriate to remind people of that fairly simple and, one might have thought, obvious proposition.

For those who missed it, here’s an old collection of scribbles from the original version of the Independent that your humble e-scribbler wrote after seeing the published transcript of Danny Williams’ first major national editorial board interview as Premier.  There are a few paragraphing changes to improve readability.  It first appeared in this space in January 2005.

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Experience Counts

For those who don’t know, I have been in the public relations business for the past 15 years. That includes seven years in politics and another eight in the public and private sectors. It’s an interesting field, if for no other reason than you keep running into people who think that because they read the papers, listen to the radio and watch television, they can do a PR job easily.

Sadly for those people, the news is filled each day with stories a buddy of mine used to call Homer Simpson moments – you see the story and the only thing to say is “D’Oh!” because the gaffs are easy to spot.

They were predictable.

They are damaging.

They were avoidable.

Danny Williams’ interview with Macleans this week was a big Homer Simpson moment. The drunk comment came in response to a leading question from someone who hasn’t worked in the province since the scotch-soaked salad days of Frank Moores. The premier fell into an old trap and joked that now the House is completely drunk. D’oh!

Understand that the editor’s question came after the Premier volunteered the opinion that the House of Assembly was “unproductive” and joked that if he had his way he would probably never call it in session. D’oh! That question came after the Macleans crowd asked the Premier why the provincial deficit was so big. His response was mismanagement over the past 10 years. There was a lengthy bit about the Stunnel; two sentences on the fishery. D’oh! The last question had the Premier calling for a seal cull. D’oh! The Premier made some misstatements of fact, for good measure (D’oh!) and a couple of big ideas got a handful of words, without explanation. D’oh! Take the whole interview and you have a bunch of poor, laughing drunks, complaining about having no money, who apparently can’t manage their own affairs, and yet who want to build grandiose megaprojects and kill seals.

That interpretation is a bit facetious, but it fits rather nicely with the condescending view some central Canadian editors hold of Newfoundland and Labrador. What was missing from the interview? Overall, the premier needed to put our issues into terms that would be meaningful to his audience. There could have been a frank explanation of how developing the Lower Churchill benefits the whole country. The Premier could have talked at length about the local companies competing successfully around the globe in the energy, manufacturing and high tech sectors. For another, he could talk about how diversifying the provincial economy gets us off the equalization rolls. The Premier could have showed how offshore oil and gas can provide Canadians with a secure supply of vital energy and give Newfoundland and Labrador economic benefits like those in Alberta. That’s the Blue Book, Danny’s supposed plan.

Talk that way and you get a feature article, at least, not a cheesy question and answer session following a reporter’s agenda. You might even get the cover. Instead, readers got a piece that Michael Benedict, the 70s cub reporter and now Macleans executive editor, could have written from his old notes. Danny made the front page of the National Post, alright, but only because someone took offence at his jokes. D’oh!

Since the interview was so far off the Blue Book, this all happened for one of two reasons. Either Danny Williams’ advisors, the people he derisively referred to as handlers, are not doing their jobs or, taking his own advice, Danny is ignoring them because he feels they are trying to turn him into something he is not. If they aren’t doing their jobs or giving dumb advice, then Danny needs new advisors ASAP. If Danny is ignoring their good advice, then he needs to take a look in the mirror.
Public relations is not a job anyone can do. It takes skill and experience. Good advisors don’t change people into flavourless mush. They knock off the rough edges and help focus thinking so someone like the premier gets his point across. They are crucial to success. In PR, like in law, the guy who acts as his own counsel has a fool for a client.

By the way, who made the cover of Macleans last week? Rick Mercer – a Newfoundlander who gets paid to be funny.

-srbp-

3 comments:

Wm. Murphy said...

In light of recent events, it seems appropriate to remind people of that fairly simple and, one might have thought, obvious proposition.



Observation noted..but what does it all mean on a go forward basis??

Ed Hollett said...

It means, quite simply that things remain now as they were at the beginning: opportunities are lost, things are screwed up in a major league way for bush league reasons.

If you are happy with the way things turned out, then there is no implication.

If you wonder how much better things might have been, then you have good reason to wonder.

And if you are worried what else got shagged up along the way, then you may well have grounds to worry what will emerge in the next few months once DW leaves.

WJM said...

then you may well have grounds to worry what will emerge in the next few months once DW leaves.

That's why Deity invented shredders. Just as Danny cares so much about His People as to not occupy one of their hospital beds, he cares enough about His People's mental health to spare them the anger, frustration, and mental health issues that might come of having things emerge.


AWESOME word-verification: hyperfsh!